thehouseatr3n3corner:

†††

There are good reasons for any species to think darkly of its own extinction. Ninety-nine percent of the species that have lived on Earth have gone extinct, including more than five tool-using hominids. A quick glance at the fossil record could frighten you into thinking that Earth is growing more dangerous with time. If you carve the planet’s history into nine ages, each spanning five hundred million years, only in the ninth do you find mass extinctions, events that kill off more than two thirds of all species.

But this is deceptive. Earth has always had her hazards; it’s just that for us to see them, she had to fill her fossil beds with variety, so that we could detect discontinuities across time. The tree of life had to fill out before it could be pruned.

— Ross Andersen’s paradoxically gloomy yet intellectually pleasing piece, “Humanity’s deep future.” (via climateadaptation)

dekutree:

can you smell what the rock is cooking?

image

empandas de queso para ti y todos tus amigos jajajaja tambien hice un jugito de mango

gracias, tia roca

(via thehouseatr3n3corner)

It used to be about trying to do something. Now it’s about trying to be someone.
— Margaret Thatcher (via unplannedchild)

(via aaronboy133)


motherearthnewsmag:


Making a Homemade Flower Press Without the Hardware Store

By Dawn Combs
A plant press will allow a budding naturalist to preserve plant specimens in a more permanent way. Keeping a library of dried plant material connects us with the earliest botanists and medicine makers. When I first started I used phone books and old magazines stacked between heavy encyclopedias. This is a great way to work in a pinch, but invariably I lost track of which books held my latest collection and they were easily damaged or forgotten. I had in mind a plant press that James Green describes in his Herbal Medicine-Maker’s Handbook, A Home Manual, but making it required a trip to the hardware store… insert my previous comments on lack of time here…. [Find out how!]
bluepueblo:

Cliffside, Spiazzi, Verona, Italy
photo via hannah